UV254 Dip Probe


UV254 Dip Probe

Portable and Field Instrument for surrogate measurements of TOC,DOC,COD,BOD etc

The Dip Probe can be submerged by hand for portable measurements at different locations, left fixed in an open channel for continuous measurement, or floated for example on a river.

For handheld application, the Dip Probe is connected to the Photonic Measurements portable display unit. Which has all the same application software as the UV254 Go! For fixed operation, the Dip

Probe can be configured with the probe display unit. In both configurations, all data is logged for surrogate measurements (for example TOC, BOD, and COD) as well as UVT and UVA. Dip Probe comes with a light shield to remove the negative effects of ambient light on the water monitoring .

The probe can be configured upon order to have a 2, 5, 10, 20 or 50mm path length to suit your application needs.

Data Sheet

UV254 Dip-Probe Benefits

Usage


• Our portable devices are icon-driven touch screens

• Allow you to store 16 different water matrices, on one system

• Ergonomically designed

Battery


• Ten hours on a single charge, letting you get a day's to work done on a single charge

• Charged over USB

• Battery as standard

Measure


•Real time continuious measurement with results stored every 12 seconds 

• Support SUVA measurements and UVA

• We store your reference measurement, no zeroing to DI water before each test

• Our device has 5 different measurement ranges depending on the probe connected

• Continuous use LEDs for stability and long life, not mercury lamps

• Optional TSS

Storage


• Every measurement is stored for review and data export.

• All our measurements are datestamped and stored on the device, allowing you to track back the history of any set of measurements

• Store more than 500 million results, that is enough data for twenty years.

• Handwriting results into lab books is one of the biggest sources of errors in the modern lab. We can transfer results straight into Excel from the USB port on our device